Iolanthe
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TITLE The Theatres
AUTHOR  
SOURCE THE CANDID FRIEND
YEAR 1901
MONTH/DAY December 14
VOLUME 2
PART/ISSUE 33
PAGE/COLUMN 270
TRANSCRIBER HJP 29 April 2005

"IOLANTHE" was most successfully revived at the Savoy on Saturday last, and rightly, for this charming work is fresh as ever. "Iolanthe" is an extraordinarily witty piece, worthy to rank beside the great masterpieces of satire; and, if ridicule killed in this country, the House of Lords would not have survived the first production. Certainly, under the French Monarchy, the authorities would have censored the performance, for fear of its effect on the Chamber of Peers. As it was, a crowded audience laughed and cheered at each point, and encored every number of the exquisite music.

     MISS ISABEL JAY is the Phyllis. She is as tall as any of her three lovers, and yet, in the pretty Watteau dress, manages to look the daintiest "rogue in porcelain" imaginable: she gives a fascinating performance. Miss Agnes Fraser, Miss Isabel Agnew, and Miss Hart Dyke are the three charming fairies, with Miss Rosina Brandram for their Queen. Miss Louie Pounds sang sweetly as Iolanthe. One could not but compare Mr. Walter Passmore's performance as the Chancellor with that of Mr. Grossmith: still, Mr. Passmore was excellent; and so were the other men. Only I am sorry that Mr. Lytton, who played Strephon, was allowed to put in that stupid gag about his pro-Boer leg. It was quite out of the picture and was not well received: I hope that by now it has been dropped. In every way, “Iolanthe” is the most delightful play now running in London: no one should miss it.
 
 

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