Iolanthe
HOME
PUBLICATIONS A-Z
THESPIS
TRIAL BY JURY
SORCERER
H.M.S. PINAFORE
PIRATES OF PENZANCE
PATIENCE
IOLANTHE
PRINCESS IDA
MIKADO
RUDDIGORE
YEOMEN OF THE GUARD
GONDOLIERS
UTOPIA, LIMITED
GRAND DUKE
OTHER WORKS
PEOPLE


Free Guestbook from Bravenet
powered by Powered by Bravenetbravenet.com


Free FAQ Database from Bravenet
powered by Powered by Bravenetbravenet.com


Free Free For All Links from Bravenet
powered by Powered by Bravenetbravenet.com


 

TITLE Savoy Theatre
AUTHOR  
SOURCE MUSICAL TIMES
YEAR 1882
MONTH/DAY December 1
VOLUME 23
PART/ISSUE 478
PAGE/COLUMN 664-665
TRANSCRIBER HJP 5 November 2000

     The production of a new work by Messrs. Gilbert and Sullivan concerns a musical journal in a limited sense only. Music here takes a very subordinate position, and is severely handicapped by the clever sallies and preposterous puns of Mr. Gilbert, which, although amusing enough in themselves, are not very congenial to the most serious of arts. Every credit is due to Mr. Sullivan for doing what, under such circumstances, he has done on this as on many previous occasions. Again he clings, with the desperate energy of a drowning man, to the few points of genuine sentiment vouchsafed by the author, and again he manages to wed pretty if not very original tunes to the, musically speaking, most irrelevant words ever put together. There is, moreover, nothing in his score that is absolutely commonplace or vulgar, if we except the close of the first act, which reminds one painfully of the typical finale (with cancan obbligato) of the French opera bouffe. To the general style of that entertainment Mr. Sullivan's music of "Iolanthe" is as superior as are Mr. Gilbert's words. The prevailing character of the score is sufficiently indicated by the above remarks, to which it is necessary to add only that the regulation number of "patter songs," sentimental ditties, short ensembles, and noisy march tunes, will not be looked for in vain by those who take a delight in such matters. Gilbert and Sullivan's joint productions have by this time established a type of their own, and of that type "Iolanthe" is an excellent specimen. The performance, carefully superintended by author and composer, was, in its way, perfect, and the enthusiasm of the public on the first night knew no bounds. Mr. Grossmith, Mr. Barrington, Mr. Temple, Miss Leonora Braham, and Miss Alice Barnett materially aided the success of the rendering. These excellent artists can scarcely be classed amongst vocalists proper, but many an operatic star might learn from them how to pronounce their words with unfailing distinctness, also how to suit intelligent dramatic action to those words.
 
 


Questions / Comments about the site?  Contact Helga Perry